CPA Members Profiles - T

CPA Members Profiles – T

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Malory Tate - CPA Selected Member

Malory Tate - CPA Selected Member

I make one of a kind sculptural vessels inspired by the 17th and 18th Century. Reflective of the artistic movements of these time periods, my work is a contemporary interpretation of objects that focus on extravagance and specificity. Memory and sentimentality also play a key contributing role in my creative process. More often than not, my pieces are designed for flowers. Either to create a unique display in a grand arrangement or a piece to highlight one specific type of bloom such as a tulip.
My pieces are thrown and altered, although I often describe my process as ‘hand-building with thrown parts’. I work with a semi-porcelain body that allows for a high level of manipulation and fire my work between cones 6 and 8. I have developed a series of blue, white and green glazes forming a palette of varying textures from crystallised satin mattes to high glosses. I manipulate the surface of my pieces to produce a water-colour effect on more ornate forms whilst other designs will showcase an elegant contrast of a white exterior with a coloured interior.

Louisa Taylor

Louisa Taylor

The source of inspiration for my work stems from museum collections of 18th Century dining vessels, reflecting on the evolution of functional objects to accommodate new foods and dining trends. I am interested by elaborate dining rituals of the period associated with wealth and status and the performance of multi-course dining events. My aim is to create meaningful objects that interplay between still-life, visual composition and encourage social interactions through use. Each piece is made from porcelain and thrown on the potter’s wheel. I create components, which I then cut, freely assemble, and finish by hand. The subtle colour palette is directly influenced by hand painted decoration on historical tureens. I deconstruct each individual colour and match it with glaze and combine this with honed forms. All my work is fired to 1260-1280°C in an electric kiln/oxidised atmosphere.